Measurers of Lumber

Purpose
Measurers of Lumber, in modern terms, inspect and measure firewood and bark brought into the town for sale to insure the correct quantity and grade.

Terms & Members
Measurers of Lumber are elected every year at the Annual Town Election to serve a term of 1 year. The office is currently held by:
  • Jim Barry
  • Robin Peakes Coutts
  • Cameron Peters
History
The original Massachusetts General Law, which describes the board can be found under M.G.L Chapter 28, Sections 141-148 (Part 1):

Section 141
"There shall be one or more persons elected by the inhabitants of each town, at their annual meeting, to be surveyors of lumber, who shall he be skilled in the surveying and measurement of lumber, and who shall hold the office for one year, or until their successors be chosen, unless they shall be sooner removed."

Section 142
"The said surveyor shall survey oak and other hard wood, commonly used in ship building, and mahogany, ash, cedar and other ornamental wood and lumber, and all other lumber brought into their town by water for sale."

Section 143
"In the survey of pine boards and planks, there shall be four sorts ; the first sort shall be denominated number one and shall include boards not less than one inch thick, straight grained, and free from rot, sap, knots and shakes; the second sort shall be denominated number two, and shall include boards not less than one inch thick, free from rot and large knots, and suitable for planing; provided, that such boards as are clear, but are deficient in thickness as aforesaid, shall be received at number two, by making such allowance for the deficiency in thickness, as may be required to make them equal to one inch thick; the third sort shall be denominated number three, and shall include boards not less than seven eighths of an inch thick, nearly free from rot, and nearly square edged, and suitable for covering buildings; the fourth sort shall be denominated number four, and shall include all boards and planks of every description, not being within the other three denominations."

Section 144
"In the survey of pine joist there shall be two sorts; the first sort shall be denominated number one, and shall include all joist that are sound and square edged; the second sort shall be denominated number two, and shall include all other descriptions."

Section 145
"In the survey or spruce, hemlock, and juniper boards plank and joist, there shall be two sorts; the first sort shall be denominated number one, and shall include all boards, plank and joist that are sound and square edged; the second sort shall be denominated number two, and shall include all other descriptions."

Section 146
"In the survey of ash, maple and other hard wood,and ornamental boards, plank and joist, there shall be two sorts; the first sort shall be denominated number one, and shall include all boards, plank and joist that are sound and free from shakes; the second sort shall be denominated number two, and shall include all other descriptions."

Section 147
"In the Survey of timber, except mahogany cedar, there shall be two sorts; the first sort shall be denominated number one, and shall include all lumber that is sound, straight, square edged and in lengths or joists not less than sixteen feet long, due allowance being made for sap; the second sort shall be denominated number two, and shall include timber of all other descriptions."

Section 148

"In the survey of mahogany and cedar, there shall be but one sort; and the surveyor shall number all the mahogany and cedar logs or sticks, contained in each lot or cargo, in regular commercial order and mark the number of each log or stick upon the same, in legible characters; and be shall to the best or his ability, ascertain the whole number of feet, board measure, in every log or stick."